Wednesday, December 22, 2010

In which I see the moon...

We are living in a magical marshmallow land where the mundane is topped with soft and bouncy snowy cushions. The ordinary becomes extraordinary masked by snow and ice.

I summon up sufficient layers of clothing, grab the camera and go out to greet the great outdoors. I'll regret it if I don't;  I'll look back in July and think 'I can't believe the garden was ever white-over.' Sod's law has it that the camera battery gives out two snaps into my photo shoot. Pah!

I manage at least to photograph the wisteria outside the front door. Water had trickled drip on drip down the plant and made a fantastic cascade which ends on the outside light. Where the water has come from I don't know - the temperature this afternoon soared to a remarkable -3 degrees (not above freezing you note) - so arguably any water should not have been liquid. I know, I know. The photograph does not do it justice.

The effort of putting on all those layers of clothing should not be wasted so after stumping indoors to put the battery on charge I come back out to feed the hens; up on the field to throw corn and replace frozen water and, at the same time, yell obscenities to the small flock of starlings which have discovered easy pickings. Grr! Damn and blast you! Starlings, leave that food alone.

Later, much later, when the fires are lit and the lights on the Christmas tree sparkle I spy, through the glass of the garden room windows, a rosy glow in the east beyond Fir House. It is the rising moon, a huge moon of the rosiest red which soars, even as we watch, above the horizon. I know last night, the night of both solstice and eclipse, was the night to see the moon but tonight it is here for us. It is the fairly insignificant red dot in the picture below.

If it looks pretty special to me and mine, hung about with all our knowledge and technologies how much more so must it have been to our predecessors on this old hill. A thing of magic and mystery. The shivers I feel on my shoulders are sometimes not to do with the cold.

11 comments:

Twiglet said...

I noticed a beautiful moon later on last night. Sadly not pink then though. Nature is always so amazing isn't it.

Kirsty.a said...

Love that photo with the moon framed by the ornaments

GeraniumCat said...

Isn't it funny how the moon looks so huge until you take a picture of it? I mean, I know there's physics involved, but it doesn't explain it adequately...

elizabethm said...

What stunning photos of the icicles! I think you have had it colder than we have, and we are cold enough up here. It was stunning this morning but somehow with the district nurse's visit and the turkey being delivered by a friend I didn't get out with a camera and now we have lost the extraordinary crystal light. And yes about the moon!

Frances said...

Ahhh, what a beautifully written post this is. Your photos are perfect companions to your words.

I sympathize about the camera battery, having had similar moments. I'm glad that, so far, my inner eye's memory bank doesn't need batteries!


xo

Pondside said...

That's it - you've done it again - a magical post. The words, the photo - thank you and Merry Christmas!

SmitoniusAndSonata said...

A friend and I gawped at the same moon's glowing , magical perfection and even forgot that the bus was late and our feet were freezing .....

Chris Stovell said...

Yes, it always sounds as if you live in a magical place... but I'm willing to bet it's you who sees the most magic and also makes it happen for other people.

I'm writing to thank you for your support - especially over the last few weeks - and to wish you a very Merry Christmas and a happy, healthy and peaceful New Year. Cx

rachel said...

Have a wonderful Christmas, and don't let your batteries run down too soon! Look forward to reading more from you in 2011....

Nikki-ann said...

Merry Christmas! :)

Jayne said...

Merry Christmas to you and the GA and a happy and peaceful 2011.